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"Tanizaki in praise of shadows"

Tanizaki in praise of shadows pdf

by: Michael M.
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May 28, - But nowhere does Tanizaki's ode to shadows flow more melodically than in his writing about Japanese lacquerware: Darkness is an. OF SHADOWS. Jun'ichirō Tanizaki. Translated by Thomas J. Harper and Edward G. Seidensticker. LEETE'S ISLAND BOOKS. LEETE'S ISLAND BOOKS ATS. In Praise of Shadows book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. An essay on aesthetics by the Japanese novelist, this book ex Rating: 4,1 - ‎11, votes.


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English translation, Leete's Island Books In his delightful essay on Japanese taste Junichiro Tanizaki selects for praise all things delicate and nuanced, everything softened by shadows and the patina of age, anything understated and natural - as for example the patterns of grain in old wood, the sound of rain dripping from eaves and leaves, or washing over the footing of a stone lantern in a garden, and refreshing the moss that grows about it - and by doing so he suggests an attitude of appreciation and mindfulness, especially mindfulness of beauty, as central to life lived well.

He writes of drinking soup from a lacquerware dish as a form of meditation. Tanizaki was inspired by the play of candlelight on lacquerware, and it made him think of the sweetmeat called "yokan", whose "cloudy translucence, like that of jade; the faint, dreamlike glow that suffuses it, as if it had drunk into its very depths the light of the sun," invites careful attention.

Tanizaki said that when yokan is served in a lacquer dish, inside the dark recesses of which its colour is scarcely distinguishable, it assumes the status of a votary object. Tanizaki's relish in the world and its ordinary pleasures offers a sharp contrast to the functional, plastic, disposable aesthetic of modern western life. Although his aesthetic is associated with a cultural perspective markedly different from western varieties, there is nevertheless something essentially familiar about it.

It addresses the felt quality of experience in the lived moment, not just as an end in itself but because each such moment belongs to a lifelong series in the ideal in which beauty and richness of experience are important components of the good life. It does not take much to show that this idea has many expressions in the western tradition; for example, an analogy exists in Walter Pater's final Renaissance essay, where he says, "The service of speculative culture towards the human spirit is to rouse, to startle it to a life of constant and eager observation.

Every moment some form grows perfect in hand or face; some tone on the hills or the sea is choicer than the rest; some mood of passion or insight or intellectual excitement is irresistibly real and attractive to us," and therefore we must be vitally aware, in order to be present at the focus of the intensest perception. And then he adds the famous - to some, the infamous - words that inspired the "Decadent" movement of the late 19th century: "To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.

The difference between Tanizaki and Pater lies in the tranquillity of the former as against the intensity of the latter. But both share an interesting assumption, which is that the richest experience is wide awake, unclouded by drink or drugs, the senses fresh and lucid in their transparency to the world as it is - and finding in its colours and savours, its textures and transitions, the deepest resource of the value it affords. Readers of Tanizaki are variously startled or entertained to find that his essay on the delights of what is muted, enclosed and refined by shadows, begins with a paean to the lavatories found in Japanese monasteries.

These places of "spiritual repose", as he calls them, are situated away from the main buildings in a fragrant grove of moss and leaves, and from their privacy of finely grained wood one can look out at blue sky and greenery.

Their prerequisites are "a degree of dimness, absolute cleanliness, and quiet so complete one can hear the hum of a mosquito. Probably Tanizaki's own inspiration for his hymn to nuance came during just such a quiet moment in Kanto, as the rain dripped outside and the peaceful enclosing shadows of the monastery privy gave him infinite space for thought.

Rereadings: AC Grayling on a fine study of Japanese aesthetics. AC Grayling. Published on Sat 5 Oct English translation, Leete's Island Books In his delightful essay on Japanese taste Junichiro Tanizaki selects for praise all things delicate and nuanced, everything softened by shadows and the patina of age, anything understated and natural - as for example the patterns of grain in old wood, the sound of rain dripping from eaves and leaves, or washing over the footing of a stone lantern in a garden, and refreshing the moss that grows about it - and by doing so he suggests an attitude of appreciation and mindfulness, especially mindfulness of beauty, as central to life lived well.

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In Praise of Shadows Quotes Showing of “Were it not for shadows, there would be no beauty.”. ― Jun'ichirō Tanizaki, In Praise of Shadows. 79 likes. Like. “Whenever I see the alcove of a tastefully built Japanese room, I marvel at our comprehension of the secrets of shadows, our sensitive use of shadow and ich.calcionotizie24.net by: In praise of shadows. [Jun'ichirō Tanizaki] -- Widely considered to be a classic, this essay on Japanese aesthetics by a major author ranges from the patina of lacquerware and the custom of moon-viewing to monastery toilets and the lighting in a. Sep 01,  · In Praise of Shadows by Jun'ichiro Tanizaki, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(K).